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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

similarity

The extent of similarity a person believes there to be between him/herself and someone else in terms of cognitive and physical characteristics is measured with four, seven-point items.    

With five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a consumer believes that every unit of a particular branded product performs the same way as the other units of the product and with the same goal.

This seven-point scale measures how much a consumer believes one smartphone is similar to another phone on four characteristics related to ease of use.

A person’s chronic behavior to categorize all manner of things is measured with three, seven-point items. 

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.

How much variety of choice a consumer believes there is in a table of product options and attribute information is measured with three, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point items measure the similarity between a consumer’s self-image and his/her idea of a “typical” user of a brand.

How much a person identifies with and feels close to members of a particular community is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three questions with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much difference a person believes there to be in the activities he/she has engaged in during a specific time period.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of brands they were exposed to seem to have been intentionally made to resemble each other.  While the sentences do not explicitly refer to the similarity of brands’ packaging or some other visual attribute, that is the implication.