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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

social

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person feels close and connected to a particular company.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures how much a person believes that, in a particular past situation, other people had a lot of power over him/her.

Seven, seven-point items measure how willing a person is to engage in relationships with people who have a mental illness.

How much a person wants to support opinions that others do is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much one customer believes another customer has engaged in behavior which disrespected one’s personal space and signaled it was his/her own.

The scale has four, five-point items that measure how much a person primarily socializes with other Latinos rather than non-Latino Americans, about the same amount for both groups, or only socializes with non-Latino Americans.

Three seven-point, Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s belief that being in a particular restaurant gives him/her the feeling of being special and having more social status than in other restaurants. 

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.

The degree to which a person featured in an advertisement behaves in a way that is consistent with the social norms of the country in which the ad is run is measured with four items.