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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

social

Seven, seven-point items measure how willing a person is to engage in relationships with people who have a mental illness.

The scale uses seven, seven-point items to measure how much a person cares about what others think of him/her and works to have good relationships with others. 

The scale has three, seven-point items and measures how much a person feels appreciated by society because of something he/she has used.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures how much a person believes that, in a particular past situation, other people had a lot of power over him/her.

How much a person wants to support opinions that others do is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much one customer believes another customer has engaged in behavior which disrespected one’s personal space and signaled it was his/her own.

The scale has four, five-point items that measure how much a person primarily socializes with other Latinos rather than non-Latino Americans, about the same amount for both groups, or only socializes with non-Latino Americans.

Three seven-point, Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s belief that being in a particular restaurant gives him/her the feeling of being special and having more social status than in other restaurants. 

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

The extent to which a person believes another individual is a peer and thinks like him/her is measured with three, 101-point items.