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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

social

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be organized, effective, and decisive in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with nine.

The scale has three, nine-point unipolar items that measure the extent to which a company or set of companies is viewed as lacking competence in its interactions with customers.

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be moral, kind, and helpful in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with ten.

Three, nine-point unipolar items measure the extent to which a company or set of companies is viewed as lacking friendliness and warmth in its interactions with customers.

How confined and stuffy a space feels to a person is measured with five, seven-point items. 

The degree to which a person believes there are clear social norms that people should comply with in his/her country is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes there are clear social norms and that he/she should comply with them.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer worries that purchasing a certain product might result in others thinking less of him/her.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the importance a customer places on having a personal relationship with a company employee.  The phrasing of the sentences implies the employee is a professional from whom one may seek advice and support.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer of a company believes that a particular employee of a company provides timely and regular information about how the customer’s suggestions and other involvement help to improve customer service.