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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

social

This scale uses six items to measure how involved a person is with a website such that it connects one to a community and is part of daily life.  The scale appears to be most relevant for use with social media websites.

The extent to which a person believes that a restaurant is very special and has more social status than other restaurants is measured using seven-point, Likert-type items.  A two- and a four-item version are provided. 

The extent to which a person believes a particular activity would help feel more intimate with another person and strengthen their emotional connection is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person felt close to a particular person during an initial interaction and wants to spend more time with him/her is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The desire to fit in with and be part of a particular group of fans is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point questions, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she has superiority and higher status compared to other owners/users of a particular brand.

How unique and noticed a person believes he/she would feel with a certain product is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be organized, effective, and decisive in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with nine.

The scale has three, nine-point unipolar items that measure the extent to which a company or set of companies is viewed as lacking competence in its interactions with customers.

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be moral, kind, and helpful in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with ten.