You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

social

Using seven, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the attitude that there is inequality of social groups and some are superior to others.

Five, five-point items measure a person’s belief that, with respect to heterosexual couples, one gender tends to dominate food-related decisions while the other is more dependent.

The four item, seven-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person wants to make some decisions in such a way as to make someone happy and indicate how much their relationship is valued.

How much a person feels his/her life is important and that he/she is essential to others is measured in this scale with five, nine-point items.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that another person does not legally own a certain item but is engaging in behaviors that seem to signal that he/she does.

The degree to which a person feels uneasy when society appears to be changing rapidly is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person believes it would be enjoyable to post online regarding a particular product is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using three Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person is involved in a particular hobby and identifies with it, e.g., driving, baking, fishing.

Four items measure how much a consumer believes that a particular product he/she purchased was not identifiable to others nor did it draw attention.  For the scale to make sense, it probably should be used with respect to a retail store in which one’s shopping activity could be witnessed by others.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.