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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

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The degree to which a person believes the source of some information, probably another person, is pushy and aggressive is measured with three, nine-point bipolar items.

The scale uses three statements to measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has expert level knowledge with respect to a specific product category and is an excellent source of information for friends buying such a product.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on mass media advertising when shopping for a specified product.

This is a four-item, five-point that measures the importance a person places on independent, expert information sources.

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

A six-item, seven-point summated rating scale is used to measure the frequency with which one contacts professionals in the health care industry for information about health-related issues.

The purpose of the scale is to evaluate the importance of a group of information sources in learning about a health-related topic. The common theme among the six sources composing the scale is not perfectly clear. Some are personal, professional sources (items #1 and #2 below) while the rest are promotion materials.

Respondents are asked to use a five-point scale to rate how important each of nine sources is in learning about a specified topic. The nine information sources mainly involve the traditional mass media.

Three items are used in this scale to measure the importance placed by a consumer on information from websites in learning about a specified topic.

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree of importance interpersonal information sources have to a person when shopping for a certain product.