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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

stimulation

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person is motivated to seek something stimulating and satisfying at the current time.

The extent to which a person feels astonishment and wonder after viewing an advertisement is measured with three, seven-point items.

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.

The degree to which a customer is motivated by a stimulus (unspecified) toward the pursuit of a consumption-related goal is measured with a five-item Likert scale.  In a consumer context, the inspiration comes from some type of marketing activity and, as stated in the items, stimulates a purchase motivation.

How much a person experienced something that inspired him/her to do something is measured with four, seven-point items.  As phrased, this scale is general and could be applied in a wide variety of contexts where the focus is on a temporary state a person has experienced rather than an enduring trait.

The degree to which a person reports being involved in and stimulated by a particular stimulus is measured with four, nine-point uni-polar items.

Ten, seven-point items are used to measure how effectively a product is believed to enhance physical energy and mental acuity.  To answer some of the questions, the respondent must have used the product rather than merely hearing about it.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with a variety of foods, beverages, drugs, and supplements which are claimed to increase one’s energy.

How long a product improved a person’s mental performance is assessed with four, seven-point items.  To answer the questions, the respondent must have used the product rather than merely hearing about it.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with a variety of foods and supplements for which claims are made about increasing one’s cognitive ability in some way.

The degree to which a person reports feeling mellow or, at the other extreme, very energetic is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The five, seven-point semantic differentials that make up this scale are used to measure the extent to which a person is open to new ideas and experiences.