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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

store

A person’s expected enjoyment of a store as well as his/her willingness to shop there and recommend it to friends is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The sentences are hypothetical because the store was only described for purposes of the study with words and images.

A consumer’s likelihood of using a smartphone in a store when searching for product and price information is measured with five, seven-point items.

The scale measures a customer’s intention to continue purchasing a specified good from the same specified retailer as was purchased from in the past.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.  The sentences are stated hypothetically but can be easily adapted for measuring actual repurchase intentions by replacing the word “would” in each sentence with “will.”

Four items measure how much a consumer believes that a particular product he/she purchased was not identifiable to others nor did it draw attention.  For the scale to make sense, it probably should be used with respect to a retail store in which one’s shopping activity could be witnessed by others.

The scale measures how much a consumer believes that it is awkward and uncomfortable to purchase a particular product when the behavior can be observed by others.  Based on the items, some of the embarrassment comes from the product itself while some is due to other people witnessing the purchase.  A five- and an eight-item version are described.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that there were too many customers in a store.

With reference to a particular shopping trip and store, three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the extent to which a consumer left without making a purchase.

Leaving an area within a store or the store itself without buying the product of interest is measured with six, seven-point semantic differentials.  Two versions of the scale are described. Temporary abandonment has to do with the shopper's intention to return later in the shopping trip to make the purchase while Permanent Abandonment means the shopper does not plan to return to buy the product.

How much a consumer indicates that the purpose of a particular shopping trip was to look for new ideas and products is measured with three, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a shopper believes that a store’s layout and arrangement of shelves make it difficult to find desired products.