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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

strength

The extent to which a person believes a particular activity would help feel more intimate with another person and strengthen their emotional connection is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much an individual likes a certain person and is committed to a relationship with him/her is measured with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.  Because of the phrasing of one item, the scale appears to be most relevant when the two people had the opportunity to “friend” each other on a particular social media website. 

With six, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures a person’s ability to recover from stressful events that are experienced.

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree to which a person indicates having a social connection with a particular person in the past.

The scale uses three, five-point unipolar items to measure how much a person describes someone as having traits stereotypically associated with males.

The degree to which a person is confident that his/her attitude toward an object is correct is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

The extent to which a person reports feeling powerful at a particular point in time is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.  To be clear, this is a measure of a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic.

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a person believes that a message was persuasive and changed what he/she thought about a topic.