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stress

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree of anxiety and worry felt primarily because of the unpredictable events in one’s environment. (While this scale is not measuring stress due to the changing status of the natural environment per se, its perceived degradation could be one of the causes of overall stress along with other external stressors.)

Usage of one’s phone to help relieve stress and deal with other uncomfortable situations is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-like items.

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

The scale has five, five-point items that measure how much a person feels mentally drained and unfocused at the current time. 

The degree to which a participant in an experimental task reports being unable to concentrate and focus is measured with seven, ten-point Likert-type items.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures a person’s ability to recover from stressful events that are experienced.

Composed of five, five-point items, the scale measures a person’s belief that he/she is burdened with personal financial instability as well as uncertainty and, because of that, not able to enjoy life.

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.