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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

stress

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

The scale has five, five-point items that measure how much a person feels mentally drained and unfocused at the current time. 

The degree to which a participant in an experimental task reports being unable to concentrate and focus is measured with seven, ten-point Likert-type items.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures a person’s ability to recover from stressful events that are experienced.

Composed of five, five-point items, the scale measures a person’s belief that he/she is burdened with personal financial instability as well as uncertainty and, because of that, not able to enjoy life.

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

The scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes, in general, that stress can enhance rather than debilitate his/her learning and productivity.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes that employees of a business engaged in behaviors that infringed on one’s space and activities in the establishment.