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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

targeting

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s willingness to have advertisements by a social media platform such as Facebook target him/her based on information from another company’s website.

The six, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale are intended to measure a person’s willingness to have personalized advertisements targeted at him/her by a social media platform based on demographic inferences from his/her usage of the website.

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to have a social media platform such as Facebook target advertisements at him/her based on information provided by the person in his/her profile.

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s willingness to have advertisements targeted at him/her by a social media platform such as Facebook that are based on information gathered from the person’s behavior at the website.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular advertisement has been aimed at him/her due to some behavior or characteristic inferred by the advertiser.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s belief about how favorably “other people” would think a group of people were portrayed in an ad.

A person's belief that an advertiser created a particular ad and aimed it at people like him/her is measured with three items.

Eight, five-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that standard measures that are primarily market-based are used to evaluate the job performance of advertising agency account planners. There were two versions of the scale, one to measure the way planners are currently being evaluated and another to measure the way they should be evaluated.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure perceptions about the degree to which an advertising medium is able to target specified audiences efficiently. As used by King, Reid, and Morrison (1997), the scale was meant to be completed by respondents knowledgeable with media planning.