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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

task

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person was daydreaming or thinking about other things during a particular task.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular task in which he/she has participated was fun and interesting.

A person’s preference for multitasking (switching attention among several ongoing tasks) rather than performing one task at a time until its completion is measured in the scale with 14 Likert-type items.

Four items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports focusing only on product-related information in a task and ignoring other information.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale is used to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by one of two trait-like “modes” of attention: focus on the immediate environment (experiencing) or stimuli-independent thought (mind wandering).

During a particular task, how much a person’s mind was wandering and thinking about other things is measured with three, five-point items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures the time and effort a consumer reports spending to choose between options within a product category that were available in a store.