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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

task

A person' expressed feeling of physical discomfort while performing a certain task is measured in this scale with three statements.

With four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the level of involvement a person reports having when a particular activity was performed.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.

The level of distraction a person experiences in a room used for an experiment is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses five items to measure a person's self-confidence in his/her ability to forward e-mail messages to others if the content is considered to have value for them. 

The extent of a person's engagement in a certain activity is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The level of effort and time required to complete a specified task is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The belief that a choice one is making is self-determined rather than being externally imposed is measured in this scale with five, nine-point Likert-type items. Botti and McGill (2011) referred to the measure as personal causality.

How responsible a person feels with regard to a decision that he/she made is measured in this scale using four, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's evaluation of his/her mental strength at a particular point in time, e.g., while engaged in an experimental task.