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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

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The extent to which a person believes he/she will be able to save the necessary funds for some potential future purpose is measured in this three item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

The degree to which a consumer reports having had difficulty making a recent decision, possibly to the point of being confused and overwhelmed, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.

A person's preparation for and eagerness to begin a certain task is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The problem a consumer has distinguishing between brands in a product category and choosing one of them is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The complexity of a certain task is measured in this scale with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The task that was evaluated in the study by Sprott, Czellar, and Spangenberg (2009) was a survey (how complicated it was to answer).

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

The extent to which a person expresses the ability to regulate his/her engagement in an activity is measured using four, seven-point items.

The basis on which a person thinks a decision was made is measured in this five-item, seven-point scale. Essentially, the scale attempts to measure the relative roles played by affect and cognition in a particular decision a person has made.