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taste

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s belief that locally produced foods taste better and are more nutritious than those produced elsewhere.

Five semantic differentials compose the scale and measure facets of a food product’s quality and taste.

How much a person likes a beverage based on the way it looks and tastes is measured with four, seven-point items.

The tastiness and healthiness of a specified food is measured in this scale with four, four-point semantic differentials.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears like it could be used with a wide variety of foods and beverages.

The tastiness of a particular food, with the emphasis on its moistness and juiciness, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.

How well an object (food or beverage) tastes is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic differentials.

A person's attitude toward eating a particular food is measured with four, seven-point items.  The emphasis of the statements is on how tasty the food is expected to be.

How much a person likes a new food or beverage product and expects it to be successful when it goes on sale is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.