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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

threats

This three-item, seven-point scale measures a person’s inclination at the current time to react toward others in a physically violent manner if threatened.  The wording of the items is meant to focus participants’ responses on their current states rather than their longer-term trait-like tendencies. 

The degree to which a person feels uneasy as it pertains to his/her identity is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale has five, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes there are hardships he/she must overcome that were bought on by an unspecified “external force.”

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The extent to which a person considers some particular object as being weird and creepy is measured with three, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure how much a person worries that some person or thing lessens his/her importance, job, and very existence.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes his/her language skills were the reason why he/her was treated unjustly by someone else.

With five items, the scale measures a person’s sensitivity to the threat of illness and the transmission of disease with respect to a variety of specific objects and situations. 

Twelve items measure the degree to which a person considers a wide variety of specific objects and situations to be repugnant, particularly if they are viewed as threatening one’s health.

Four questions and a seven-point response scale are used to measure how much a person believes the side effects of a medicinal drug are serious and threatening.