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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

time

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a good or service can not be produced and stored for consumption at a later time.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how long and unacceptable a person believes a particular delay to be.  While the scale might be used for almost any delay, it was created for an occasion in which consumers could experience the problem with a service provider.

The scale uses five, nine-point semantic differentials to measure whether a person considers his/her future needs to be most important or his/her current needs.

The belief that someone put more thought and time into writing a review than the average reviewer is measured with six items.  The object of the review is not stated in the sentences but can be put in the instructions if not obvious from other aspects of the experiment or questionnaire.

How much a person is mindful of and attentive to the time until he/she retires is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.

How long a person felt a period of time was when waiting for something to happen is measured with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much time and effort a person must expend in order to follow the advice given to him/her by a professional in order to achieve the desired outcome.

A person’s preference for when to get up in the morning and when to go to bed at night is measured with thirteen questions.  The construct is also known as circadian preference and morningness.

How complex and time-consuming a task is considered to be is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.