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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

touch

Three Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s sense of having been in a mediated environment or virtual reality that had characters and/or objects. 

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes she/he was able to move a hologram with his/her hands.

How much an object is considered to be touchable and concrete is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which an object has a texture that feels comfortable and gentle against the skin.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes a particular object has a fine texture and feels plush.

Containing four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which an object is perceived to feel smooth and supple.

Using eight, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person wants greater physical intimacy with a particular person, e.g., to touch, smell, see, hear.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has the power to handle and use an object as desired.

The extent to which a person wants to make things with his/her hands is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point items.

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.