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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

travel

A person’s expressed probability of traveling to a particular foreign country as a tourist is measured with three, seven-point items.

The three, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale measure the degree to which a person who has visited a place (unidentified in the items) is willing to visit it again if the same level of service is provided.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with hotels, restaurants, resorts, and a wide variety of other places people visit that provide some degree of service and which can affect one’s intention of returning to in the future.

A person’s stated likelihood of traveling to a particular place is measured with four, eleven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s intention to say good things about a resort and encourage friends to go there. It appears the scale is easily adaptable for other places that involve lodging.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure how much a consumer engaged in spending behaviors during a trip such as impulse buying and poor decision-making due to insufficient planning and not sticking to a budget.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

How well a person likes a hotel and wants to stay there is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using four statements with a seven-point response format, the scale measures the likelihood that a customer would travel on a certain airline again in the future.  Wagner, Hennig-Thurau, and Rudolph (2009) called it loyalty intentions. The scale is phrased hypothetically because participants were responding to a fictional scenario.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a customer's belief that it is easy to do business with a company because of the helpfulness of its employees.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a customer believes there are benefits to using a particular service because it makes a certain activity easier to accomplish.