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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

trust

The extent to which a brand is viewed as authentic and credible is measured with three, nine-point uni-polar items. 

The degree of responsiveness and dependability a person believes there is in a particular technological interface is measured in this scale with five, ten-point semantic-differentials.

This six-item scale measures how much a person believes that the writer of a review was honest and accurately described his/her experience with the “product” (broadly defined).

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s negative attitude regarding large food systems (producers and retailers) and the desire to avoid buying from them.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.