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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

trust

How much a person believes that people working for an organization (retailer, company, non-profit) have his/her the best interests in mind and keep their promises is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person considers a relationship he/she has with a particular entity such as a person or company to be characterized by trust and loyalty is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The level of confidence a person has in a particular retailer and belief in its reliability is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a brand is viewed as authentic and credible is measured with three, nine-point uni-polar items. 

The degree of responsiveness and dependability a person believes there is in a particular technological interface is measured in this scale with five, ten-point semantic-differentials.

This six-item scale measures how much a person believes that the writer of a review was honest and accurately described his/her experience with the “product” (broadly defined).

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s negative attitude regarding large food systems (producers and retailers) and the desire to avoid buying from them.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.