You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

trust

A person’s general level of trust across a variety of people and situations is measured with 25, five-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure one’s trust of a particular person or those playing a specific role but rather the tendency to trust others and be optimistic about their intentions.

How much a person relies on his/her feelings in making decisions across situations is measured with seven, seven-point items.

Using six, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that an organization to which he/she belongs is competent and caring about its members.

Using four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the honesty and ethicality of something.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears that it can be applied to a particular person or a group of people.  While it might be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of non-human entities (ads, organizations), it seems most suited for people.

A person’s confidence in a brand that has been endorsed by a particular celebrity and willingness to buy the product is measured with three, six-point Likert-type items.

Eight, nine-point items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks that a price listed for a certain product is the actual price that will be charged by a particular retailer.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

A person’s level of trust in the benevolence, integrity, and competence of someone who has sent him/her a product-related message via e-mail is measured with nine, seven-point items.

The level of trust a person has in a third party label on a package and the party sponsoring it that attests to an aspect of the product’s quality is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.