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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

trust

The scale assesses the extent to which a consumer is wary that a store is gathering his/her personal information and using it for business purposes.  The scale was used by Demoulin and Zidda (2009) with respect to a loyalty card issued by a store, thus, they referred to the measure as perceived risk associated with the new loyalty card.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a company has done something unexpected that has damaged their relationship.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a buyer believes that a particular seller is dependable and sincere in its customer-related activities.

The degree to which a person believes a company claims to be something that it is not is measured in this scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.  Although the scale was developed for use with a business, the items seem to be amenable for us with other entities such as government or non-profit organizations.

This scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure a person's opinion of an endorser's honesty and dependability.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that is intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks a specified hospital where he/she has been a patient was accurate in its billing for the services provided.

This scale has six, five-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks the discharge process he/she experienced upon being released after a hospital stay was handled well by the hospital staff.

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that companies should noticeably position warning-related information in print ads rather than burying it where it is less likely to be seen. The scale was referred to as responsible advertising by Torres, Sierra, and Heiser (2007).

The six, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale are used to measure the degree to which a person has a tendency to trust other people, particularly the ones already known, until/unless there is reason to do otherwise. Grayson, Johnson, and Chen (2008) referred to this measure as generalized trust.