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values

The extent to which a person considers another person to be honest and true to him/herself is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a consumer believes that a particular brand is always guided by the values it has been associated with over time.

The extent to which a person believes that a hierarchy of power is necessary among people in society to maintain order is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This five-item, seven-point Likert-type attitude scale measures the importance a person generally places on being able to express who he/she is and that it is one of his/her highest values.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person has high standards when making choices in life and does not settle for anything less than the best.

A person’s trait-like tendency to prefer middle choices as a goal in decision-making strategy is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The importance a person places on instructions and procedures to guide his/her expectations, particularly in a work context, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The degree to which a person feels virtuous and having high standards at a certain point in time is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The extent of similarity a person believes there to be between him/herself and someone else in terms of cognitive and physical characteristics is measured with four, seven-point items.    

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular task he/she engaged in strengthened what was personally important in life.